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By George, He’s got it!

I share with you an enlightening poem from across the dis-functioning Bay Bridge, which connects the Western Shore with the Eastern Shore of Maryland. I was not going to call you at 0400 hrs George to let you know I was doing this George. Sleep well my friend.

I would guess George has been a friend for close to twenty years. Geeze, that was back in the days when we had a president that said ” “Brownie, you’re doing a heckuva job.” Where does the time go?

Now in this day and age we have the CDC Says “Do Not Go to Work, “President Trump Says, “Thousands With Coronavirus Could Go to Work and Get Better.” Fill those pews on Easter Sunday. A Greek Tragedy?

Often after he posts something on one of his many venues, George sends me scurrying to find out just what in the hell he is referencing. Most often I’m successful, but on occasion I’m left scratching my head. Enjoy the poem.

The best short social isolation poem so far is by Grandpa Brody

poor georgie’s almanackUncategorized March 25, 2020 1 Minute

nintchdbpict000372862596.jpgIt was his response to a recent “poor georgie’s almanack” posting.

FREEDOM AND CAGES

I looked out my window and saw a great sight,   A bird and a squirrel were having a fight. Seeds on the ground were causing their rage, They were free, unlike me, pent up in a cage. Coronavirus dumped on us, a rampant deluge,    We’re saved for the time in our homely refuge, The squirrel has bolted, the bird struts around,    My heart’s with the seeds all over the ground, It’s so strange inside, I can hear graying hair,    Sounds of the crowds, and look, no one’s there, We are stuck in the house for a foe that is viral,    All normal relations are in a downward spiral. The long golden silence is but tarnished words,    I long for outside, breathing free like the birds, My life of the past and its warmth do I seek,    I’ve endured this affliction for all of one week. Squirrel has returned eating seeds that are left,    Looking out of my window to the world, bereft Of my freedom to move anywhere that I please,    To enjoy the squirrels and birds in the trees. Next week may be better, a brisk sunny walk,    Or perhaps my dear wife and I will just talk, About the day when this plague’s in the past,    But for now, how long will this dilemma last?

Published by poor georgie’s almanack

Retired. Writing essays about local and world events that affected the decisions made by our ancestors that resonate with our lives today. We are who they were. Also writing my take on what Ben Franklin’s Poor Richard’s Almanack might be like in a modern world that now has electrcity. I was head of PR for The Washington Post during Pentagon Papers and Watergate, special assistant to the Postmaster General, senior staffer on the US Senate Foreign Relations Committee, a show business press agent, Chicago chamber of commerce press relations manager and consultant to US and international governmental and nongovernmental agencies and corporations. Examples of my work are in the Smithsonian and Newseum collections. poor georgie’s almanack (since 2011) can be found at http://georgekroloff.blogspot.com You can Google it or follow me on Facebook or Twitter. View all posts by poor georgie’s almanack Published March 25, 2020

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Don’t forget to check on the elderly.
The bald guy on the right turns 77 today.

theRooster Semper Fi

Travels on Delmarva with Harrison

Steinbeck had “Travels with Charlie.” Mitch Album has his “Tuesdays with Morey,” and there was “On the road with Jack Kerouac.” I think I’ve now got the start of “Travels on Delmarva with Harrison.” You’ve already met Harrison last month at Kern’s retirement party.

Image result for delmarva peninsula

Back in October of last year, my son-in-law asked me if I’d be interested in spending a few days a week with his father traveling about the shore. The shore would be the Eastern Shore, known to many as the Delmarva Peninsula. His father is in his late 80’s, and he experienced a stroke several years ago, which has affected his speech, balance, and short term memory to some degree.

Image result for chesapeake nurseries
Chesapeake Nurseries Inc.

Harrison is the husband of Sylvia and the father of Greg, Lisa, and Julie. There are also grandchildren and, most recently, a great-grandchild. His father immigrated to the United States in the early 1920s from the Netherlands after first arriving as a flower bulb salesman. Harison’s father ultimately established a nursery business in the Salisbury Maryland area. That business, under Harrison’s love and guidance has grown considerably. Under Greg’s guidance the nursery continues to propagate.

Image result for Delmarva Peninsula

So, just where is the Delmarva Peninsula, you might ask? The Delmarva Peninsula encompasses parts of Delaware, Maryland, and Virginia. All that land east of the Chesapeake Bay and south of the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal ending at the Virginia, Bay Bridge-Tunnel at Cape Charles, makes up the Delmarva Peninsula. We even have a Regional Spaceport here.

Field Crop News Photo/Winter Wheat

Harrison loves the history of Delmarva. He loves the land, especially the open fields, many of which are planted this time of year with Winter Wheat. These fields remind me of Ireland, so green in their contrast to the trees still in their winter hibernation. Historical homes and buildings are a natural magnet for Harrison. Harrison also loves his midday meals, which we share. Perhaps we shall have some Gastro insight down the road.

My new-found buddy knows the short term memory has taken a trip to somewhere not in the present. There are moments when a delightful chuckle will come up, “oops,” he might say, you better ask Sylvia that one when he has a thought, and it fly’s off the carrier deck like an F-18. Never is this gentleman frustrated with his position in life. He is a kind, gentle human being who loves his family, life, the land, and the Eastern Shore.

His devoted wife drives him to the local senior center five days a week for some Physical Therapy, and comradery, with those on the same station in life as he. We are starting our fourth month together, and I continue to learn from this man with so much knowledge of what I like to say, this, that, and other things.

May this week bring me more adventure as I travel the Eastern Shore with Harrison. With the blessing of those close to him, I look forward to sharing some of them with you.

Thank you Sylvia, Lisa, Greg, and Julie for sharing someone special with me.

Super Tuesday’s this week, don’t forget, vote early, vote often.

Don’t forget to check on the elderly.

A share by someone I follow

Caterpillars Don’t Become Butterflies!

Posted on January 6, 2015 by mitchteemley

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Did you know that caterpillars are not “transformed” into butterflies? In metamorphosis (the name of the process), a caterpillar is liquefied. Only after its actual death can entirely new creature, a butterfly, emerge!

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But most people’s image of the process is more like Eric Carle’s classic children’s book The Very Hungry Caterpillar, in which the little caterpillar “makes a cocoon around himself and goes to sleep, only to wake up a few weeks later wonderfully transformed into a butterfly!” (amazon.com)

The Very Dead Caterpillar would probably have sold fewer copies. But it would have been more accurate.

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When I was a kid, I used to love going to La Mirada Creek and catching those pudgy little pre-frogs we called pollywogs (you may have known them as tadpoles). I would bring them home and dump them into a tub, and then watch with fascination as they shed their tails, sprouted legs, and crawled out like showroom models: “The new Frog!” That’s transformation (“change of form”) and it’s majorly cool. But it’s not what a caterpillar does.

A caterpillar dies.

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After building its own coffin (cocoon), the caterpillar seals itself inside—and dissolves. And then, in a process only vaguely understood by scientists, that stew of free-floating genetic material undergoes a total metamorphosis (“change of nature”).

In other words, butterflies are not souped-up caterpillars, they’re entirely new creations made from caterpillar soup!

Not surprisingly, caterpillars and butterflies are used as spiritual symbols in virtually every culture on earth. But because the real process is so radical and so little understood, they’re nearly always represented as symbols of transformation, rather than metamorphosis. To be fair, many religious teachings do help people become better caterpillars.

But that’s not enough.

According to Jesus, God doesn’t want souped-up caterpillars, he wants butterflies. He wants us to die to ourselves (Luke 9:23-24) and become completely “new creations” (2 Corinthians 5:17). Just like caterpillars do.

The Apostle Paul (in the Greek language of Romans 12:1 and 2) describes the process of metamorphosis like this:

Present your bodies as a living sacrifice (build your cocoon and get in!), holy (‘set apart’), acceptable to God (nothing short of metamorphosis can accomplish this)… Don’t be conformed by (don’t take on the ‘shape’ of) this world (or ‘age’ or ‘era’), but (instead) be metamorphosed (changed in your very nature) by the renewing (‘regenerating’ or ‘re-growing”) of your mind (incidentally, the Greek word for mind is psuche—the same as the Greek word for butterfly!) so that you may be discerning (only by being metamorphosed can you know) what is the will of God (as opposed to the will of a dark and broken world), what is good, well-pleasing, and perfect (‘complete’ or ‘whole’—in contrast to the incompleteness and brokenness of this world).”

Viceroy_Butterfly

Caterpillars and butterflies are the world’s most popular symbol of transformation. But they’re also a far more powerful and challenging metaphor than most people realize.

It’s still the beginning of a new year. What better time to start over, not just as “the new You!” but as a completely new creation!

Are you ready to start work on that cocoon? Thanks Mitch, much appreciated, theRooster

Don’t forget to check on the elderly.

The Passing of an Old Friend

On 24 September an old and dear friend of twenty five plus years left his earthly homeland of Bavaria, Germany. Hubertus, along with his two brothers, owned a centuries old farm on Collins Wharf Rd in Allen, MD. This farm, which lies behind a brick gateway along Wicomico Creek has been a mainstay of the community since 1733.

Hubertus was surrounded by daughters Natalie, Isabel, Carolin and Sophie who held him, and eased his fears to let go, and feel safe in his passing.

Hubertus reminded Mary Agnes and me as being like an overgrown Leprecheaun. Hubertus was always so happy with life, especially his yearly visits to the Eastern Shore and the village of Allen.

There are nothing but wonderful memories of Hubertus and his daughters over the years. Once I picked him and his entourage up at Dulles airport each year, it was a constant how’s this, how’s that and what’s new. This went on non-stop until once on the Eastern Shore and the “Kentucky Fried Chicken” sign was spotted,

it was time to stop, all were hungry.

He shall be missed by all those he touched.

Rest in peace my friend as you sail off in das Boat.

( Hubert’s greatest toy was his hydrofoil, brought over from Germany in a shipping crate many years ago. The scene of that boat flying up the Wicomico River at 60 mph with Hubert at the helm, shall be greatly missed.)

My best interpretation of the Death Notice

You are no longer where you were,
but you are everywhere we are

DR. Hubertus Rechberg
died peacefully in the circle of his beloved daughter

  • 12 March 1948 in Munich
    Died September 24, 2019 in Garmisch-Partenkirchen

In great love and gratitude we bid farewell to our father, father-in-law, grand-father and brother.

Wednesday the 2nd of October

11:00 am funeral service and funeral takes place
in the parish church ST. Clemens in 82438 Eschenlohe place.

12:30 – 17 o’clock approx. Reception in Wengwies

5.30 pm Children’s dinner PANCAKES – at Kiki
(Maus’s kitchen is occupied by the caterer!)

8 pm Family Dinner- at the Mouse

Until we meet again my friend.

Semper Fi
Don’t forget to check on the elderly.

A Visit to Maryland from North Carolina

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The author of https://amehrling.com/ center, Anne Mehrling with husband John on the right and the Rooster’s wife Mary Agnes and, our trusty K-9, Benjamin Franklin after the Mehrling’s  stopped by on a trip from North Carolina to Long Island, NY.

 

The Rooster and his wife were so appreciative to have the Mehrling’s stop by on their trip north today. We have followed Anne’s blog for a number of years, and she has followed mine. We have been known to frequently respond with comments towards each other’s writings. Although time committments didn’t allow the visit to be lenghthy, it was wonderful none the less, in meeting the person holding the pen. Well, the hand punching the keys at any rate.

I’ve grown to know the family through Ann’s Blog, as well as the growth of eight year old neighbor Logan and others who live close by. It’s simply amazing how the blogging world brings people together. This one short visit and life’s event sharing, paints the picture further and fills the gaps not said in a Blog.

Several days earlier I had mentioned to our eldest daughter of the pending visit. My daughter inquired, what we would do if they turned out to be Cereal Killers? No worry’s here I assured her. The only thing that turned out to be dead was their car. Seems the van they rode in was a rental with NY plates. Anne has written several times lately about their own van. It died on them once at a Funeral Home, (how appropriate)  and, most recently needed a jump to get started. Turns out this was something I cautioned her about recently. Just yesterday she wrote in an email about their coming trip the following,  “To set your mind at rest — we got a new battery for the car this morning.  Yes, it helps my mind, too”. The cereal killer got the van my daughter.

So I’ll end this Blog with a most appreciative, thank you Anne and John for taking the time out of your busy schedule to vist with us. You are more than the fingers walking across the keys. We call you our friends and look forward to returning the visit, The Rooster and wife.

elderly couple

Don’t forget to check on the elderly.

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From our house to yours, we wish you all a very Merry Christmas.

 

 

 

Cast Your Vote

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The Immortal Jukebox, A Blog about Music and Popular Culture

A fellow blogger and a person I consider a friend would love for you all to check out his blog and cast a vote on his behalf, especially if you like music.

Two of his favorite Blog Posts were:

http://wp.me/p4pE0N-AL Bob Dylan, The Nobel Prize, The Albert Hall & Me!

http://wp.me/p4pE0N-xL Duane Eddy – An imaginary road movie in 5 songs

Thom Hickey
Twitter Handle:
@thomhickey55
Blog URL:      http://theimmortaljukebox.com

From Thom’s Blog:

Vote! Vote! Vote! Vote! Vote! for The Immortal Jukebox (& groove to The Shadows!)

I was very grateful and somewhat amazed at how many of my readers took the time to nominate The Immortal Jukebox for The UK Blog Awards.

Now I would like to ask you to move to the next stage and vote for The Jukebox (and encourage all your family, friends, and social media contacts to do the same!).

Please follow the link and select Art & Culture from the drop down menu:

http://blogawardsuk.co.uk/ukba2017/entries/immortal-jukebox

As a reward here’s ‘Wonderful Land’ an early 60s guitar instrumental from the one and only Shadows featuring the lyrical playing of Hank B Marvin.

 

Cast your vote here >    http://blogawardsuk.co.uk/ukba2017/entries/immortal-jukebox#votenow