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Rooster & Family Happenings on 3/22

From Sam in the Netherlands

The Crazy Davies at Christmas, Neuschwanstein Castle, Bavaria, Germanyhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neuschwanstein_Castle

Today is day 23 (I think) of Dax and Zoe having no school and day 5 for Mia and Ana. A quick recap of some of the best moments from the week. Some you may not think are great, but all made me laugh as they happened.

Zoe is standing in nothing but underwear stomping her feet, yelling for spicy water.

Dax is running as fast as he can (which isn’t very fast) to find the perfect hiding spot, only to run back to where I’m counting and ask for help.

Ana is getting mad at me for not explaining her homework the way her teacher does. She walks away, saying she’ll take care of it. After returning a couple minutes later, it is completed correctly.

Mia is so excited to video chat with her best friend from school after I set up a virtual play date for them.

The best group moment was as we sat in front of our projector screen and “rode” Splash Mountain, Space Mountain, It’s a Small World, and many more. Of course, we put our hands up and yelled, and turned to match the ride, because that’s what you do when you have to create your own fun.

What this week has taught me is that though homeschooling is something I said I would never do and this virus has ruined a lot of plans we had in the coming 3 months, it’s going to be ok. I hate that my kids understand that this virus has the power to disrupt what is normal. I also love that it has taught them how to innovate fun and how to become better friends with one another.

I would love to see what your best moments of the week were!

Daughter Kathryn

SALISBURY, Md. – Peninsula Regional Medical Center in Salisbury is taking steps to prepare for an influx of COVID-19 patients and questions. “We know right now in this time of high anxiety and wondering what’s really out there and what information should I listen to, people are trying to understand where they can get the right answers,” said Dr. Kathryn Fiddler, vice president of population health at PRMC.

Friday nurses set up shop at PRMC’s brand new call center. The hospital tells 47 ABC they are now taking calls seven days a week, from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. The health professionals taking calls are able to answer questions about COVID-19 and provide advice on how to stay healthy. “They can understand how their symptoms are, whether or not they should call a health provider, also whether or not they should isolate at home,” said Dr. Fiddler.

Outside in the parking lot, a large tent was set up in case the hospital needs extra space in a patient surge. PRMC’s chief nursing officer tells us this tent is one of a kind for the region, and will be shared by multiple other hospitals. “Currently we have a cleaning crew here. The tent came packaged very tightly and very neatly, so we need to undo that and with that comes a lot of opportunity to clean. We want to make sure that when we do we have the availability and they need to open it that it’s absolutely 100% ready for our patients, and we want to ensure that it is clean to start,” said Sarah Arnett. When the tent is ready, it’ll be equipped with temperature control, running water, and can hold up to 20 patients.

Because the tent is right underneath one of the hospital’s helicopter pads, the pad is shut down temporarily. Hospital officials say helicopters will land on another pad on the other side of the campus. Hospital officials also say that the city of Salisbury helped to organize everything. The city donated weighted barrels and concrete barriers to help keep the tent safely in place and out of the way of traffic.

PRMC says they’ll continue to monitor the volume of calls and what types of questions people are asking so they can adjust staffing at the call center as needed. If you have questions about COVID-19 or are worried about symptoms, you can reach the call center at (410) 912-6889.

Husband Jeff went into DC for a few days last week, now he’s ordered to stay home. He Telecommutes, and gets to throw a line in the water and fish at lunch time. Now Yellow Lab, Lady Liberty has a dog walker 24-7. Life is good on their side of the river.

Categories: CoronavirusLocal NewsMaryland

Tags: call centercoronaviruscovid-19dr. kathryn fiddlermarylandpeninsula regional medical centerprmcsalisburysarah arnetttent

Sarah the Deliverer

A VISIT FROM THE MIDDLE CHILD.

Hi everyone! I have been “working” from home since last Tuesday which isn’t saying a whole lot since most restaurants are closed or only allowing carryout. The club and retail business units are helping make up for our losses. Cameron drove home from Alabama instead of Spring Break and Blaire is home working at the nursery. Sydney is in San Diego workout from home. Ray is working at the nursery, Tommy can’t go any further than 60 miles away. Greg is laying off all non-essential workers in anticipation of shipping across state lines being suspended. I’ve only had a couple of freak out moments and then I take a walk and get those endorphins working. My closet is super organized In descending rainbow 🌈colors and I’m enjoying cooking and cleaning and wearing prairie dresses. Currently at MVA for Poppy and then Porch time visit with them. Love to you all😘

I’ve delivered some fresh produce from How Sweet it is for my parents who are under self quarantine for the next Two weeks. My sister and I want to still see our parents without putting them at risk of exposure to the virus. We call it “Porch Time”. Enjoyed warm sunshine and a lovely visit while maintaining 6 feet distance apart. Best to everyone in these challenging days ahead. Thank you Kathy Fiddler and all of our healthcare workers at PRMC for working so hard to keep our community safe and healthy.

God Bless her, she just came by with an order the Mrs. placed earlier. Some noodles, Chopped Maters in a can, a chicken. Her Aunt in-law, Diane, sent a bag of books and plates from MVA for my new truck. She got the plates on her third trip the day prior to it’s closing for Covid-19.

Matt & Family in CT

Son Matt & wife Beth, in Connecticut, are well as is his family the last we heard. Daughter Jill home from Siena College, Freshman in HS Rebecca is home, David working from his Apartment in NYC and Kevin, he’s at his Apartment at UConn continuing on line studies.. 

The Rooster and the Mrs. are doing just fine, deliveries coming in as needed, three active hens starting to produce a few eggs now that the weather is warmer. Ben doing fine and providing exercise as we go on potty missions. I lift Ammo Box’s for part of my exercise and walk the house most time FitBit tells me to do so.

Rooster Stuff

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I have a new truck, well, new to me anyway. The old truck was a 1992 Chevy Silverado, the new truck is a 2001 Ford F-150, Super Cab, 4×4. Right now it’s getting some Rocker Panel repairs. I should have it back in a few days. This new vehicle has Reverse gear, the old truck could only go backwards if parked facing an up-slope. Oh, and the new one has windshield wipers also. My arm got tired when hanging outside with a squeegee. It’s been an adventure with that old Silverado for the past sixteen years.

The Local Grands, Abby and Rachael are still at their respective jobs the last I heard. Rachael is busy still setting up her new home to her specifications, now that she’s a home owner. Tommy, USAF, down in NC, is well and hoping for some leave next month.

Travels with Harrison

Harrison and the Rooster did their thing this past Thursday, 3/19. We had no contact with anyone ,other than the Drive-Up window at Arbys. We made a Dump/Trash run, organised the box Harrison keeps on the front seat of his P/U Truck. The BOX was used by Harrison’s father over the years, Back in the day. That box holds some special meanings. By late on Saturday after confering with the wife, daughter, CDC and others I made a decision to pretty much shelter in place. For now, I’ll miss my days with my Buddy, the education he has provided me on so many things. Last week was a Latin language class of sorts.

Arbor- tree, Walnut -Euglandis, Maple – Acernis, Wood – lignum

The End – Finis

So, I’ve most likely bored you to death should you have stayed to the end. Be SAFE, Be SMART and don’t hoard the toilet paper.

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Don’t forget to check on the eldery.

theRooster Semper Fi

Dumster Talk

Throughout my life, I’ve lived in quite a few places. South Jersey was my home for the first eighteen years. In case you don’t know, everyone in New Jersey lives near an Exit, that Exit is off either the NJ Turnpike or the Garden State Parkway. Some folks way up north will quote an exit off I-80 which runs E to W from the George Washington Bridge to the Delaware Water Gap bridge at the Pennsylvania line.

George Washington Bridge from New Jersey-edit.jpg
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Washington_Bridge


So, after that bit of geography, the better part of my early years was spent close to exits #3 & #5 just off the NJ Tpk. And Exit # 4A off the Garden State Pkwy. Thanks to the United States Marine Corps, while stationed at the Earle Ammunition Depot in Colts Neck, NJ, I also lived a short distance off Exit #8 of NJ Tpk.

After graduation from high school, the Marine Corps moved me about to assignments in South Carolina, North Carolina, Washington, DC, New Jersey, Japan, and California.

I married my wife of 54 years while in the Marine Corps and upon discharge we resided in northern Maryland for a year before moving to Connecticut and ultimately a career with the Ct State Police, retiring in 1988.

Maryland Eastern Shore counties.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eastern_Shore_of_Maryland

Upon retirement, the little woman wanted to relocate to the northern Maine coast. As for me, I was looking to travel south to the Gulf Coast of Florida. We wound up compromising and found the Delmarva Peninsula and the Eastern Shore of Maryland.

We were Yankees no longer, we now live below the Mason – Dixon line and are Southerners. There is a lot on conjecture as to the exact placement of those markers. Some folks locally say Mardella Springs has an original marker, others will tell you Delmar is the line of demarcation. In either case, we’re about 20 some miles south of that infamous line.

So, for the past 31 years, we’ve lived as Southerners. During that time, we’ve met some characters along the way. For this story, I’m calling the featured character Charlie.

Charlie lived in on a small wooded plot in a small trailer just off the main road that ran from Allen to Trinity, MD. This was not a terribly long stretch of road, only 3 1/2 miles to the old Trinity Church cemetery near our present home. Every Christmas and Easter someone comes by and places plastic flowers on two or three of the grave markers.

Christmas in July decorates the grave markers, no Easter changeover this year.

It’s been told that Charlie, back in the day, as they say down here, once was a store owner. Some kind of malady occurred in his life that caused him to give up the store and live a life of solitude., thus the trailer in the woods.

Charlie could often be found in the local country store sitting on an old wooden milk carton under a big fan. Charlie would be talking about the past with the store’s proprietor for the better part of a morning or afternoon, especially in the summer. You would always know when Charlie was there, his dog Brownie would be lying outside awaiting his return. Inside the store, lying about somewhere, was the resident Collie, Chief. He was the companion of the store owner and resident historian, who we shall call Butch.

When we first moved to Allen, since named Eden by the Federal Government and Postal people, there was no trash pickup or mail delivery. The post office was part of that general store and the Post Master or Mistress as in this case just happened to be Butch’s mother and he most often referred to as “Mother.” She went by a slew of names depending on who she was referring to her at the time. I always called her “Yes, Ma’am.”

Often while depositing trash at the “Transfer Station” one might run into Charlie. Growing up in New Jersey, we called them “Dumps” and would always make a “Dump Run” when making a deposit. I guess down here I just made a transfer, stuff to be used by someone else, I guess.

At times Charlie could be found conversing with the manager of the Dump, his name was Slim. Slim was there from opening to closing, watching over the three dumpsters, two for household trash, one for metal. There was no recycling back in those days, just household trash and NO construction materials were allowed. You were in big trouble should you transfer building Materials. Those had to go to the big Dump in Salisbury where you were weighed and had to pay a fee.

Often times, Charlie’s dog Brownie could be found in one of the dumpsters, looking for some munchies he was. You always had to examine before making a drop into the bin. There was a rare occasion when Charlie himself could be found in a dumpster. More than once this writer had to hold up the throw of a bag into the bin for fear of injuring a dog, stray cat or Charlie himself.

I would spend a lot of time chatting with Slim and Charlie from time to time. Slim was always up to date on what was biting on the hook in the local waters. With no Barber Shop in town, the Dump would often be a place to keep up with the local goings on, along with the Post Office and General Store of course. That old store made the best sandwiches I’ve ever tasted.

At one point in the past, old Charlie showed up at the Dump with a second dog. This dog was also brown. I asked Charlie what the dog’s name was, Charlie responded, “Brownie II.” How simple and appropriate I thought.

As time passed, Charlie appeared one day at the Dump, and the elder Brownie was not with him. I asked where the old dog was, and Charlie responded, “dead.” I wondered what happened? I asked Charlie and he replied, “Metalosis.” Not familiar with the term I asked, what is Metalosis? Charlie kinda chuckled and said, “The metal in the bumper of the car that struck him, what done it.

Life, South of the Mason Dixon Line, with the Rooster.

December 3, 2017

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Historical Society Breakfast

In the Village of Allen tucked along Passerdyke Pond and Wicomico Creek, a select crew of dedicated residents keep working hard to bring nourishment and entertainment to our community. On Saturday of this week the residents were provided a Country Breakfast courtesy of the Allen Historical Society. The menu consisted of : Scrambled Eggs, Scrapple,  Bacon, Fruit Cocktail, Toast, Coffee, Tea and Juice. All this for $7.00 and an opportunity to ask Santa for that special gift you desire to wake-up to on Christmas morning.

 

 

 Our daughter and Rooster & Wife get their moments with Mr. and Mrs Claus.

 

A few of the worker bees who make these events happen.

Thanks Melissa, Frank, John & Aggie.

A Brief History of the Village of Allen

The village of Allen was developed in the 18th century at the headwaters of Wicomico Creek around the grist mill established by John Adams. He was a son of the Rev. Alexander Adams who was the rector of Stepney Parish from 1704 to 1769. The mill dam formed Passerdyke Pond, still a village landmark, and the spillway or trap gave the settlement its first name. The Trap, later becoming Upper Trappe, to distinguish it from a village of the same name in Worcester County.

 

The name was not changed to Allen until 1884 when it was named after Joseph S. C. Allen, the first postmaster. In the late 18th century the village had a tavern, a store, and a sawmill in addition to the gristmill. The waterfront of Passerdyke Creek thrived with commerce in the 19th century. The Methodist Church was established in 1829, and by 1860 there was a post office in the village. Several general stores have operated in the village during its history.

 

Much of the village we see today lies on two colonial land patents, “Monsham” patented by John Christopher in 1683 and “Dashiell’s Lott” patented by Col. George Dashiell in 1721. The latter was a resurvey of the “Bennett’s Adventure” patented in 1665 to Major Richard Bennett, formerly a Governor of the Virginia Colony. (From the Allen Historical Society)

The breakfast was a fund-raising effort for the Historical Society which recently purchased a home in the village that will become the home of Allen’s history. If you stayed home shame on you, you missed a good meal to start your Saturday. You would not have to clean the grease off your stove and you did not support the town you live in. If we live here, we are all part of the history for those who follow. Come out to these events if you missed this one the next time you read a notice on the Village Sign.
We have two churches in Allen, a fire department, the Historical Society and a Lions Club. We’ve had a Church Fall Bazar, Fire Department barbecue chicken, Halloween in the cemetary, the Lions Pit Beef Dinner and Saturday’s breakfast.

 
Out at the confluence of the creek and the Wicomico River is the Wicomico Yacht Club. This month a year ago the old structure was lost in a fire which started in the heating system. A new structure is under construction and it will be a grand one. There are many events held year round at this facility also to include the entire family.

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The new facility takes shape as the club celebrates Trunk or Treat at Halloween.

Many people when they hear the word “Yacht Club,” turn their nose up and think, a snooty uppity place. Not so my friends. The Rooster has been a member for thirty years and my first vessel was a 15 foot canoe, my last a 21 foot Pontoon Boat that was great for the grandkids as well as yours truly. Your grandkids will love the pool also.

 
If you’re not a member, give it some consideration or contact a member when events are occurring. Crab and Oysters feasts are just two events to bring gastric delight to you.
So, in essence what I’m crowing about is that we may be small, but we have some mighty people who bring joy and sustenance to us.

 
The Marine Corps has a saying, “The Few, The Proud, The Marines.” Be one of the few and proud of the Village of Allen and support your community. If you can’t work, buy a ticket.

 

 

Merry Christmas to all from the Rooster’s Coop to yours.

 

 

58 Years of Regalement

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On Sunday November 12, 2017 roughly nine hundred meals will be served in sit down or take out fashion in the village of Allen Maryland. For those that choose to sit, it’s all you can eat, and eat they have for fifty-eight years. If it’s Take-Out you want, trust me when I say you will not go hungry. The Rooster and family first experienced this epicurean delight twenty-nine years ago. We’ve had friends and relatives plan visits around this event. My father would actually drive from Florida for a few years just for the experience. My daughter will pick up twelve meals for family members today. For me and mine it’s kind of like Meals on Wheels.

 Planning for this event which is the main fund-raising venture for the local Lions Club began months ago. Actual preparation is accomplished by Lions and volunteers from the community. A local town crier with help from the internet keeps everyone in the know for what and when is help needed. An example of these shout outs is below.

EMail from the command post – Come for the day or come for an hour – all hands welcome and appreciated at the Allen Community Hall as we head down the home stretch to tomorrow’s 58th Annual Beef Dinner by the Allen Lions Club.  We’ll be boiling macaroni and packaging sides for carry-outs today – plenty of work to do , lots of variety, some sit down jobs. Come on down, enjoy the fellowship, and be part of a grand and glorious tradition! (Thanks for those middle of the night messages Melissa.)

Frank Knowles organizes tins of sweet potatoes for the oven and the peelers get rid of the skins.

Earlier in the week the Mrs. and I put in a few hours working with others baking and peeling 13 bushels of Sweet Potatoes. The Mrs. spent another day with our daughter and others making the gravy for the Mac and Cheese. There was a night for Turnip peeling and another for Stewed Tomatoes. Years ago the tomatoes were peeled, but now #10 cans of the slippery critters already peeled seems to work just fine. Ms. Pauline Nichols would certainly have a fit that they are now using tomatoes without skins were she still with us. Peggy Ford now rules over tomatoes with Crystal Judd as her faithful assistant. Carol Hobbs does  the Mac & Cheese and Lucy and Lynn Davis have their hand in just about everything.

I would be remiss if I failed to mention the dynamic duo of Frank and Susan, ever quiet, always there. And God Bless John Culp for playing Uber to get Ms. Sue Malone there so she could peel the Sweets, eat a biscuit or two and enjoy a hot bowl of soup. There would be an Aggie, Linda, Al, Chuck, Paul, Scott, Peter, King Lion Bruce and so many others, you know who you are, always pitching in here, there and everywhere.

When all of you get home tonight, remove your shoes and finally get to put your feet up, please know your efforts are most appreciated. This meal which brings so many together to prepare creates our own recipe for community greatness.

The fires burned late in the pit the night prior, with close to 1200 pounds of beef cooking down in the pit. When the last dish is cleaned and tables put away, the Village of Allen came together today. Every year for the past 58, a Pit Beef dinner filled many a person.

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Drive thru window staffed by Don, John and Frank

Bag Ladies of Allen.

The kitchen, a Bee Hive of activity. Cutting, stirring and packing to get the job done.

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Rick, Rickie and the Pastor seem happy and well fed.

Multi function stations, fixing sides, doing dishes and passing the food to the drive bys.

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I’m ready to sit down and eat mine.

When all of you get home tonight and remove your shoes and finally get to put your feet up, please know your efforts are most appreciated. This meal which brings so many together to prepare and break bread together creates our own recipe for community greatness.

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To all who helped make this event so special, cheers.

I guess it does take a village and our’s is special, thank you Allen.