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Valentines Day

Heart, Card, Pastels, Figure

I send Virtual Hugs to all who deem it appropriate on this day of affection, (Two Days late posting), but the thought was there yesterday. We have set our table for breakfast, and Mary Agnes is taking her morning walk with Ben, our Black Standard Poodle. She of 14-18,000 steps a day. Can you say overachiever?

My Place is set on this day.

The journal, I’ve been told, is to be kept in the car, and I am to jot down earthly happenings as I see them. Speaking of jotting things down, I picked up two new pens the other day at Staples. I love pens, and the Paper Mate Ink Joy gel 0.7 suits me well for the moment. I’ve been Journaling Daily since 11 June 2014.

My journal’s start out something liken this:

Sunday, 14 February 2021 – 30f, misty R, Valentines Day, 0452 hrs. Yes, we are early risers; today, I was the first up. There are in the house four of us, Mary Agnes, Ben (dog), Simon (cat), and yours truly, the-Rooster. Once up, heat on, fire in the fireplace, coffee pot on, the door unlocked to the porch, Ben out for relief. He will usually try to wake the neighborhood up as he barks at and chases a Deer or two outside our one-acre fence line. An occasional fox, gopher, raccoon, and even a coyote on a rare occasion will appear. I must mention that Simon goes in and out multiple times in the AM. A real PITA that one. Loves water out of a spigot also.

I must additionally mention the chickens. We have most often, for the past twenty years, had a Backyard-Flock of Hens and one or two Roosters. Presently this flock gracing our yard is 18 weeks old tomorrow. Their Guardian, named in a contest some Blogs in the past, is Gregory Peck. All indications are that he is a gentle giant. We have had a few roosters, Sadam Hussein for one, that went into the pot at an early age. A vicious fellow was he. Our grandson Thomas and his heels were a constant focal point for Sadam. May he rest in peace.

A great venue.

Today at noon (actually yesterday), we will head ton a restaurant named Mad Hatter Cafe. Those in attendance with us shall be daughter Kathryn & husband Jeff, daughter Sarah and husband Greg, granddaughter Abbi and husband Antwain and granddaughter Rachael. If ever in the Salisbury, MD area, I’ll give it a 4 * rating. The busboy was noisy and dropped a few things , otherwise a 5.

A tidbit from the Netherlands

L to R, Mia, Dax, Ana, and Zoe.

Some of you are aware that we have a granddaughter in the Air Force. Samantha is a USAFA grad and is married to another grad and classmate, and the couple has four children. The entire family has three-letter names: Sam, Zed, Mia, Ana, Dax, and Zoe. They presently work for NATO, the base is in Germany, they live in the Netherlands. They are in that Tri, come together spot where Belgium joins those two countries.

Sam, much like Art Linkletter many years before her, Sam often puts on Face Book, things our Great Grandchildren say.

Me – Zoe do you know what today is?
Zoe – Yah, tomorrow.
Touché kid

Our kids are currently playing Commissary. I guess when you’re military kids, it’s not called the grocery store.

Conversation while getting ready to go play in the snow

Me – Ana, what’s taking you so long
Ana – Mom, I had to get undressed some.
Me – Why? You were ready to go, you just had to put on shoes.
Ana – Mom I couldn’t reach my feet with all my clothes on.
Welcome to pregnancy/adult hood/etc at the age of 6

Dax flips over the back of the couch and Zed walks over, picks him up, and walks him out of the room.
Ana – Mom, are you going to send him to military school?
Me – Probably. I’ll send you too if you flip over the couch.
Zoe – I won’t flip over the couch
Me – That’s because you’re too short to reach. If you draw on the walls again I’ll send you to military school.
Zoe – I already go to military school mom.
Touché kid

It shall not be long and we can do a Where In The World is Jeff. Later this week he willbe heading out on a trip. This shall be his first trip since February of last year. Can someone say Covid?

That’s all folks!

Don’t forget to check on the elderly. B Safe & Mask Up!

Semper Fi

Note Taking

Quill - Wikipedia

I’ve written in my Journal every day since 09/14/2014. In 1973 I started with CT State Police and kept a field notebook my entire career. A wise man, States Attorney Arnold Markle once said, Document, Document, Document., if it’s not written down, it never happened. That piece of advise validated my testimony on a witness stand many times over.

About Arnold Markle

Going back to that flimsy 2 Subjects college ruled notebook I learned I ate Blueberry Yogurt for breakfast, it was 58f at 0600 and we had a high that day of 71 degrees.

With all that is going on in this day and age, there is much to write about. Be safe, Stay 6 feet apart, not 6 feet under.

In addition to WordPress I write in Medium from time to time and read fellow writers work almost daily.

I share with you Debby Germino’s article on Medium

How Note Taking Will Make You Better at Life

A 3 Step Guide to Note-Taking for Disorganized People

Debby GerminoJun 7, 2019 · 8 min read

Photo by Simson Petrol on Unsplash

I wish I had started the habit of note-taking far earlier in my life. It was always something I admired in others but could never pull off myself. I always knew it would make me a better writer but I never realized how much it could serve in every area of my life. It has the potential to improve anything you decide to take notes on.

My mother is a note taker. She notes down recipes, vacation details, home repairs, life events, accomplishments…she even notes the size and cost of her Thanksgiving turkey each year. She can tell you details of vacations she took when she was in college, down to the hotel she stayed at, the bar she went to and the drinks she and her friends ordered.

She tried to get me to start a travel journal when I was a kid and I went on my first plane trip to Orlando, Florida. She gave me a notebook and told me to write a dated entry each day detailing what activities we did. I remember really wanting to be diligent at it and take notes as my mom did. But it wasn’t until the plane ride home where I opened that journal up for the first time. As I began to journal each day from memory, my mind got ahead of myself and the task quickly became cumbersome and overwhelming. I noted a few days and quickly abandoned the process in favor of napping.

The key, as my mother had told me, was doing it every day for just a few minutes, rather than saving a whole bunch of days to write all at once.

“Note taking is like cleaning”, she said. “The more often you do it, the easier it is do.”

The Benefits

But just what makes this cumbersome task such a worthy endeavor? How does it improve your life?

Here are the key benefits that I have derived from note taking.

  1. Help You Learn Better: Your mind retains more information when you write it down because your brain has to evaluate and prioritize the information which engages different parts of the brain aiding in recall later on.
  2. Improves the Quality of Whatever You Note: Because you are paying more attention, your brain is filtering the information, linking and connecting ideas faster. This effectively increases the quality of work.
  3. Relieves Stress: When your mind is racing with a million things to do it can be calming to write them down and know that you have acknowledged each one and they will be there when you get to them later.
  4. Provides a relevant and useful account of whatever you note: Notes are more reliable than memory.
  5. Creates a greater awareness and insight: When you begin to note a particular subject or activity, you naturally pay more attention to it because you know will be writing it down. This leads to more insight and a stronger ability to make connections and correlations.

Though I was unaware of these benefits when I was 8 years old, I still admired my mother’s ability to reference meaningful dates, useful household repairs, and various practical life details that would otherwise be lost or forgotten. She was trained as a secretary and one of the last generations to have been taught shorthand. Finding her shorthand notes looked like a strange hybrid of doodling and hieroglyphics. It always baffled me how those strange squiggly shapes could actually make sentences. It was like a secret language and I wanted to be in the know. I asked her to teach it to me but I never had the patience to learn it.

She’d take her shorthand notes from a phone call and then transfer them to a notebook or file them away in an appropriate folder where she could reference them later. Though I envied her organization and useful information she had at her fingertips, I could never seem to implement it into my own life.

Don’t Be Intimidated

Over the years, I read about many methods of note taking, hoping to find the magic strategy that would enable me to embrace this process once and for all. Tim Ferriss details his intricate process of note taking and indexing for quick reference on his blog. Author Ryan Holiday has a system of his own that he borrowed from writer Robert Greene. Both of their systems are extremely detailed and quickly induce anxiety when I begin to think about implementing them.

Happiness expert and author Gretchen Rubin, writes about her note-taking process on her blog which is less overwhelming but still cumbersome. I take comfort in Gretchen’s admission that,

“while it might seem like a passive, easy task, [but] it’s actually very challenging.”

It takes a lot of mental energy and concentration to do the type of note -taking that these authors are referring to. When it’s part of your job and integral to the work you do every day it certainly makes sense to have elaborate systems in place. But as someone who struggles with organization and orderliness, trying to implement complex note-taking systems is never going to happen, no matter how great I think it would be.

The good news is you can still enjoy the benefits of note taking without having an elaborate system in place. If you are a slightly scattered and cluttered person like me then this process is perfect for you. In fact, there are just three steps to follow.

  1. Start simple.

2. See what you notice.

3. Let it evolve.

Start Simple

Photo by Kelly Sikkema on Unsplash

First, take one corner of your life that you want to notate. Maybe you want to track your energy levels to see how your workouts affect you or you want to take notes on the books you read so you can remember them better. Just pick one topic for now. This is a commitment so if you try doing too many areas at once, you’ll end up dropping it all together because you can’t keep up.

I started with daily food journaling. I began this process when I found out I had mercury poisoning and it became necessary for me to track my food intake along with my symptoms. Because this was an unusual diagnosis I felt that I needed to be hyper-vigilant of my symptoms and progress to empower myself with the information I needed to heal. I started simple. I logged what I ate and how I felt after eating.

Once you choose your subject, you’ll also need to decide whether you want to be a digital or analog notetaker or a combination of both. I began using pen and paper to write my food journals. I found a simple form that allowed me enough space to write my food and the notes I wanted to take along with it. I was able to keep it with me so I could write my food at each meal. I didn’t want to have to search an app for foods or need to have my computer close by whenever I ate so this worked well for me to start. The idea is to make it as convenient as possible so when you think of something you want to note, you have easy access to do it.

See What You Notice

As you begin taking notes, you’ll find that there are things you want to note each time or things you continue to write over and over. You’ll notice that you’re more aware of whatever it is you are logging. Thoughts will come up more often that you want to note down. This is one of the benefits. You’ll also start making correlations between things that you hadn’t noticed before. This is also a benefit.

It may take some time to notice these things. Be patient. You just want to establish the habit so it’s more important that you keep up with the notes than trying to analyze them. I food journaled for many months before I began linking specific foods with my symptoms.

Most of the things I noticed initially, had to do with the actual process of note-taking. I noticed ways I could make the process easier and more effective as I began to make it a habit. This is where the evolution begins.

Let it Evolve

Photo by Felipe Furtado on Unsplash

The longer I kept up with the habit, the more I noticed the benefits. My food journaling form evolved quite a bit over the 2 years that I continued it. I went from handwriting my journal to making my own template in Evernote. Yes, I know. I said this was for unorganized, messy people who get overwhelmed with systems and formats. This is the evolution that will be born out of what you notice. You will want to make things easier and more efficient as you figure out what information is most important for you to note. For me, I found that designing a template allowed me to add checkboxes and data points for the specific categories I wanted to keep track of.

But this was after making it a habit.

The evolution is when you find yourself taking notes in other areas of your life. You’ll notice the benefits and want to expand your process. I have found Evernote to be a great application for my note taking expansion. It allows me to create notebooks for any subject I want to have notes for. This has been an easy way to keep things organized. I still struggle with not remembering to tag each note which makes it difficult to find things later on. But I am happy that I am learning better and remembering more just from writing my ideas down. My skills aren’t up to par with my mom or Tim Ferriss but at least the habit has taken hold and I’m enjoying the process.

If you want to be a better writer, researcher, learner, student, teacher, or just better at life, make note taking a habit. Don’t be intimidated by the process. Keep it simple, see what you notice, and let it evolve.


Debby Germino is a freelance tv/film editor who enjoys writing about mindfulness, health, and strategies for happier living. She writes a bi-weekly newsletter and is open to comments and suggestions on any of these topics.The Startup

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Don’t forget to check on the elderly.

Semper Fi theRooster

What is your Legacy

Thanks Google

Today it is raining cats and dogs as a big front moved east across the Delmarva. This has been a good opportunity to catch up on blogs I follow on three different sites, WordPress, Google, and Medium. I’ve mentioned previously that I’ve been keeping a Journal for a number of years, it will now take on a different look as I encompass some of Barry Davret’s ideas.

Each half hour I get up and take to a 40 step walk, ten times through our downstairs. Two rooms, Living/Dining combination, and a Bedroom. We also have a bathroom on this level. Yes, small by most standards and a big step down from our 3500 sq/foot previous home. We do have an Annex of 900 sg/feet that is also a guest house.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 100_1169.jpg
Ready for needle and thread. To the quilt rack we will go.

Upstairs there is the Sewing room where the quilts are put together, a bedroom where the quilts are laid out, my Office and another full Bath. We also have a loft, attic, garret, whatever is your pleasure. When the Grands were Wees we would throw the lot of them up there to sleep. “Go TO SLEEP”!

See, much like that daily documenting, things are stimulating memory. I’m just doing it here in the Blog. So, here you go with a couple of sites to pull up. Especially take a few minutes for https://medium.com/@Barry.Davret/how-an-experience-journal-will-turbocharge-your-daily-writing-and-ease-your-anxiety-9e1961eb3ec3

“A life worth living is a life worth recording”. Jim Rohn

Jim Rohn, the philosopher who has left an indelible legacy of time-proven principles says:

Medium Photop

How An“Experience Journal” Will Turbocharge Your Daily Writing And Ease Your Anxiety by: Barry Davret


https://www.jimrohn.com/leave-a-legacy/

All You Need Is A $2.00 Notebook and 15 Minutes Before Bed.

Don’t forget to check on the elderly.

Journaling

I share with you CM Smith’s Blog from a while back. I’m into year four of Journaling every day. I did miss a couple of days two years ago when I had Heart Bypass surgery, but I went back into the book once I got home and captured what I could remember about, the experience in the Hospital.

People have asked me, just what do you write about? Much like my Blog, a little of this, that, and other things, no general theme. I mostly catch up on the previous day by journaling first thing in the morning, I did that before turning on the computer this morning. We had a massive lightning show last night from 5:00 – 10:30 when the eyes shut, I had to write a few words about that. I did peek at the phone to learn my wife and daughter were safely at the airport in Dusseldorf. I’ll be picking them up later on in the afternoon in the City of Brotherly Love, Philadelphia, PA, on their return home from a ten day trip to Germany.

All my Journals have pockets in the back. I’ll keep things like business cards, event tickets, significant receipts, mostly eating establishments, (something to blog about). I’ll usually have one or two of my son-in-law Jeff’s itineraries, he works for the State Department and litterlly travels around the globe. I Blog about him from time to time.

 

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My Life

 

Looking back on my life, I wish I had started blogging from the day I graduated from Boot Camp at Parris Island, SC in October of 1962. I say after graduation, because they never would have allowed anyone to do such a thing during recruit training, There are some great YouTube video’s on the subject of the Marine Corps boot camp should you be interested. I can always watch one of those to capture that part of my life, should I wish to relive the experience.

Today I start a new Journaling book, and I give you, via CM Smith’s view, his take on it making you feel better. I especially like #3, for I consider mine well worth having been lived. I have three children, nine grands, four greats, one present and one former son-in-law, and my favorite daughter-in-law. Yes, even my X son-in-law had some, Life for the Better, characteristics. He also fathered three wonderful grandchildren.

 

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A new edition is started.

 

So, read on, perhaps one day you will take up the old analog process of putting words to paper.

Remember my Mantra, “If It’s Not Written Down, It Never Happened”.

6 Unexpected Ways Journaling Will Change Your Life For the Better

 

I have been writing something about myself or my everyday for almost 2 years now. It has been one of greatest and most freeing experiences in my life because I can actually slow myself down to think about what’s truly happening around me as well as my part in it.

Most people treat journaling as something they “know they should do” but rarely ever take up the practice and if they do, they fall off the wagon within a few months. But, it doesn’t have to be this way, especially when you learn about the amazing benefits of journaling.

Here are 6 ways that journaling will change your life.

1. Dig into your true feeling

Journaling can help you get out of the way of what you truly feel on the inside. In other words, taken the time to sit and write about something that is affecting you can lead to a deeper and more realistic view of what feelings you are actually feeling.

When we are caught up in the “rat-race” of life, we tend to disregard our feelings and keep ourselves, busy and jaded. It isn’t until we slow down for some time to let the feelings inside be what they truly are.

2. Give you a point of view

Another thing that journaling can give us is a better understanding of our own point of view as well as what others may think of a situation.

It’s always thought to know exactly what others are thinking, but journaling can allow us to slow down enough to start to try to understand someone else’s point of view.

3. Remind you of a life worth living

I like to think of journaling as “my life’s story”. That alone makes it fun, enjoyable, and inspiring to write a little about myself and what is going on with me every single day.

After you have journaled continuously for sometime and you look back on the things that you have written you may realize that your life is much more interesting and deep than you once thought.

In fact, if you are down on yourself a lot, journaling is a great way to get around this and discover that your life is truly worth living.

4. Reassure yourself who you are

Do you know yourself? Without thinking too hard about it, you may just simply say, “of course I do,” yet if you haven’t done some serious introspection and work on who you are, chances are you may only know who you think you are.

This was definitely the case for me before I started writing for myself every single day. I thought that I knew what I liked and disliked, who I was, and where I was going in life.

But in reality I these aspects of myself were what I thought I should be; not actually who I was.

With journaling, I uncovered dreams and goals that I never imagine would be mine. I realized that there were so many things that I just couldn’t stand to do and therefore gave myself boundaries to say “no” more.

Journaling can do this for you too. You can finally say hello to yourself.

5. Help you record your legendary stories

The idea of being able to write for your life and then pass that writing onto someone else, whether it be old friends, children, grandchildren, etc. is inspiring.

I could only wish that my father or grandfather would have been able to pass on something like that to me. It wouldn’t have mattered if the words they wrote were deep or insightful; just as long as they were words that I could read and feel more connected to them.

You can journal every day and then pass this legacy on to loved ones later in life. They can learn about you and what made you tick as a human.

6. Build your serenity

Getting back to number one; when you start to write about your feelings and how situations in your life change your feelings you gain the ability to start to process those feelings.

Rather than leaving feelings completely bottled up inside, you can put them down on paper and get them out of your heart and mind so you can process and understand them more which will lead to a more serene existence.

This especially works well with feelings like anger, jealousy, resentment, etc. Putting these feeling out on paper and letting them take their course is a great way to stay balanced.

The simple act of writing a few words, sentences, or paragraphs everyday can have a profound and instant effect on your life for the better.

Journaling can change your life and make you more interested and interesting through the years.

elderly couple

Don’t forget to check on the elderly.

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Semper-fidelis